FUNDAMENTALS
Members Home Page

Audio Books

Audio Lessons

Commentary

Fundamental Archive

Jokes, Quotes & Illustrations Archive

Links

Photos of Bible Lands

Pillar of Truth Monthly

Questions & Answers Archive

Remarks on Righteousness Archive

Speak as the Oracles Archive

Speak as the Oracles Weekly

Video Lessons
321BibleStudy.net
Home

Remarks on Righteousness

Lessons & Quizzes

About Us

Fundamentals of Faith

Salvation in Christ

The church of Christ

Audio Bible

Jokes, Quotes & Illustrations

Questions & Answers

Calendar of Events

Church Directory

Members Section & Sign-up
Instrumental Music
in Worship
Under the NT
Part 7
Answers to Their Arguments:
Revelation
There are a string of arguments which are advanced by those who use the instrument which
they believe justify the utilization of instrumental music in worship under the New Testament.  
These arguments are consistent with all whom I have spoken (regardless of their
denominational affiliation).  They all begin with the same arguments, and end with the same
arguments.

The Revelation Argument

Another argument advanced by those who would champion the use of instrument of music is
the appearance of "instruments of music" in the visions of the book of Revelation around the
throne of God in heaven. Such passages as Revelation 5:8-10, 11-13; 14:1-5; and 15:2-4 are
appealed to to show God's approval of the instrument of music in worship.

The book of Revelation is admitted by all to be the most difficult book of the New Testament to
fully understand. It is a book of signs and symbols. In chapter one, verse one, it reads: "The
Revelation of Jesus Christ, which God gave unto him, to show unto his servants things which
must shortly come to pass; and he sent and signified it by his angel unto his servant John:".
Notice, Jesus signified the Revelation. "Signify" is best described as "sign-I-fy," to give in signs
and symbols. The book of Revelation is a figurative book, not a literal one.

In the fifth chapter of Revelation in verse six, it states: "And I beheld, and lo, in the midst of the
throne and of the four beasts, and in the midst of the elders, stood a Lamb, as it had been
slain, having seven horns and seven eyes, which are the seven spirits of God sent forth in all
the earth." Does the Lamb of God literally have "seven horns and seven eyes" or is this
figurative language?

The passage which introduced the "four beasts" is found in chapter four, verses six through
eight:: "And before the throne there was a sea of glass, like unto crystal: and in the midst of the
throne, and round about the throne, were four beasts full of eyes before and behind. And the
first beast was like a lion, and the second beast like a calf, and the third beast had a face as a
man, and the fourth beast was like a flying eagle. And the four beasts had each of them six
wings about him; and they were full of eyes within; and they rest not day and night, saying, Holy,
holy, holy, Lord God Almighty, which was,and is, and is to come." Were the beasts literal or
figurative? Both the representations of the Lamb, and the four beasts are figurative. If they are
figurative, then in the midst of figurative language the actions of figurative representations must
be taken literally. Is that consistent?

Also, in chapter five, verse eight, "the four beasts and four and twenty elders fell down before the
Lamb, having every one of them harps, and golden vials full of odours, which are the prayers of
the saints." Thus, you have not only harps, but also incense portrayed in this worship scene in
heaven. Are we to have and use incense in the church? If not, why can we have the instruments
portrayed but not the incense? The incense is a figurative representation of "the prayers of the
saints." Would it not be consistent to accept the harps as figurative representations as well?

In Revelation 14:1-5, again a literal example of acceptable worship is sought in the midst of
figurative language. Will only 144,000 (literally) be present at these scenes, or is it a figurative
representation? If it is a figurative representation, then why much the instruments of music be
literal?

In Revelation 16:2-4, is the beast of the vision literal or figurative? Is the image of the beast
literal or figurative? Is the mark of the beast literal or figurative? Did they stand on a literal or
figurative "sea of glass"? Again, in the midst of figurative language, why take the harps as
literal?

If instruments of music were to utilized by the church, would it make sense to place their only
reference in the midst of such figurative language? Would it make sense to make the only
reference to musical instruments so obscure, if the church were to utilize them?

There is no justification for the utilization of instruments of music in the words of the book of
Revelation for the church today. The acceptable pattern is what God has revealed should be
done upon the earth.

I have never said, that if instruments of music are used in heaven it would be a sin. Since there
is no indication of authority for their use by the church on earth, I do teach that it is a sin for the
church to use them here. What God wishes to do in heaven is up to Him. What He wishes us to
do in the church here on earth is up to Him. He, however, has given no indication of his
approval or authority to use instruments of music by the church upon the earth.


Go to Instrumental Music in Worship Under the New Testament 1
Go to Instrumental Music in Worship Under the New Testament 2
Go to Instrumental Music in Worship Under the New Testament 3
Go to Instrumental Music in Worship Under the New Testament 4
Go to Instrumental Music in Worship Under the New Testament 5
Go to Instrumental Music in Worship Under the New Testament 6
Go to Instrumental Music in Worship Under the New Testament 7
"It is found in Revelation!"