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Video Lessons
The Gospel for the Greek
Each writer has some things, both in matter and style, peculiar to himself, yet all
the three have much in common. Luke's Gospel has been called “the Gospel of the
nations, full of mercy and hope, assured to the world by the love of a suffering
Savior;” “the Gospel of the saintly life;” “the Gospel for the Greeks; the Gospel of
the future; the Gospel of progressive Christianity, of the universality and
gratuitousness of the gospel; the historic Gospel; the Gospel of Jesus as the good
Physician and the Savior of mankind;” the “Gospel of the Fatherhood of God and
the brotherhood of man;” “the Gospel of womanhood;” “the Gospel of the outcast,
of the Samaritan, the publican, the harlot, and the prodigal;” “the Gospel of
tolerance.” The main characteristic of this Gospel, as Farrar (Cambridge Bible,
Luke, Introd.) remarks, is fitly expressed in the motto, “Who went about doing good,
and healing all that were oppressed of the devil” (Acts 10:38; compare Luke 4:18).
Luke wrote for the “Hellenic world.” This Gospel is indeed “rich and precious.”
http://www.christiananswers.net/dictionary/lukegospelaccordingto.html

To Whom Written

Both Luke and Acts are addressed to "Theophilus" (1:3; Acts 1:1). This is a Greek
name meaning "friend of God." This was a common name, and in Luke the name is
prefaced with the designation "most excellent," a customary title given to rulers,
similar to our "your honor" (cf. Acts 26:25). Theophilus seems to have been a real
man, a Greek, who was a ruler.

The third gospel account is written in such a way as to appeal to the Greek
mindset. It is the only book in the Bible with a formal introduction according to the
classical Greek style of writing history (1:1-4), in which the author states his
subject, his purpose, his method and his audience. Luke is the gospel to the
Greeks. …

Plan

Luke consistently writes in such a way as to appeal to the logical, educated,
cosmopolitan Greek mind. Educated Greeks were humanists trained in logic. Luke
presents Jesus as the Son of man. He, more than any other writer, emphasizes the
human nature of the Lord. Luke records more than any other writer about the
childhood of Jesus, describing his natural growth as a normal, albeit perfect, child
(2:40,51-52). Luke records more about Jesus praying than any other gospel writer,
writing eleven of the fifteen recorded instances of Jesus in prayer. He emphasizes
the place of women and children in Jesus' life. Luke emphasizes the Lord's
compassion for the poor, downtrodden and sinners (cf. chapter 15). He also
stressed the dependence of Jesus on the Holy Spirit (1:35; 3:22; 4:1,18; 10:21; cf.
Acts 10:38).

Luke places greater emphasis on Jesus the Teacher. He records 23 parables of
Jesus, 18 of which are nowhere else revealed.

Luke's gospel account introduces in the New Testament the concept of Jesus as
man's Redeemer (1:68; 2:38; 21:28; 24:21). Jesus is our near Kinsman (Hebrews 2:
11), "in all things ... made like His brethren" (Hebrews 2:17), Who purchases us for
the Lord (cf. Leviticus 25:23-55; Ruth 2:1; 3:12).

Luke comes closest of the gospel writers to penning a formal biography of Jesus.
His is a formal history, with several references to events and persons prominent in
Syria and Rome at the time. Luke gives the fullest account of the life of Christ,
revealing a number of events not elsewhere recorded.

The beloved physician reveals a world wide view. He traces the lineage of Jesus
back, not just to Abraham, but all the way to Adam (3:23-38). Luke alone records
several events that demonstrate the Master's interest in Gentiles (2:10,32; 3:6; 4:
25-27; 10:25-37; 17:16; 21:28; 24:21). Luke's is the gospel of the universal grace
of God.

Outline

Introduction - 1:1-4
I. The Birth of John - 1:5-80
II. The Birth & Childhood of Jesus - chapter 2
III. The Preparation for Jesus' Ministry - 3:1 - 4:13
IV. Early Ministry in Galilee - 4:17 - 7:50
V. Later Ministry in Galilee - 8:1 - 9:6
VI. Withdrawal Northward - 9:7-50
VII. Later Judean & Perean Ministry - 9:51 - 19:28
VIII. Closing Ministry in Jerusalem - 19:29 - 21:37
IX. Betrayal, Trial, Death - chapters 22 - 23
X. Resurrection, Appearances, Ascension - chapter 24

http://www.christistheway.com/2003/a03a03ba.html
Preface
1.1-4
John the Immerser Promised
1.5-25
To Mary
1.26-38
Mary's Visit to Elizabeth
1.29-56
Birth of John
1.57-80
Birth of Jesus
2.1-7
Announcement to the Shepherds
2.8-20
Circumcision of Jesus
2.21
Jesus Presented at the Temple
2.22-30
Jesus in Jerusalem at Twelve
2.41-50
Jesus in Nazareth
2.51,52
First Rejection in Nazareth
4.16-30
Raising the Widow's Son/Nain
7.11-17
Annointing in Simon's House
7.36-50
Companions of Jesus
8.1-3
The 70 Commissioned
10.1-24
Visits Martha & Mary/Bethany
10.38-42
Healing 10 Lepers
17.11-19
Zacheus at Jericho
19.1010
EVENTS PECULIAR TO LUKE
The Two Debtors
7.41-50
The Good Samaritan
10.25-57
The Rich Fool
13.7-9
The Barren Fig Tree
13.6-9
The Wedding Guest
14.7-11
The Great Supper
14.15-24
Counting the Cost
14.25-35
The Lost Sheep
15.1-7
The Lost Coin
15.8-10
The Prodigal Son
15.11-32
The Unjust Steward
16.1-13
The Rich Man and Lazarus (?)
16.19-31
The Unprofitable Servant
17.1-10
The Unjust Judge
18.1-8
The Pharisee and Publican
18.9-14
The Pounds
19.11-28
PARABLES PECULIAR TO LUKE
Click to go to Luke: The Gospel for the Greek (2)