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Overview of
The HISTORY OF
ISRAEL
The next twelve books of the Old Testament comprise The History of Israel.  These books
chronicle the history of the nation of Israel upon the Promised Land from the conquering of
Canaan to the captivity of Babylon to the restoration to the Promised.

Joshua shows that God gave Israel the land of Canaan.  Under the leadership of Joshua,
Israel does not win the battles against the Canaanites by military might, but by the hand of
God.  God has given Israel Canaan, and God can take it away.

Judges shows the status of the nation of Israel before they had a king.  Judges chronicles the
period during which Israel had a true theocracy.  There was no ruler of the nation, except God.  
His revelation through the prophets and priests guided the nation, and judges (many times,
more properly deliverers) brought the people back to their national prestige.  During this time
Israel slips into bondage because of their refusal to keep the laws and commandments of
God, and are brought out of this bondage because of their willingness to repent.

Ruth is a touching story of the love of a daughter-in-law for her mother-in-law, and the
daughter-in-law's love for Jehovah.  Ruth becomes extremely important in her place in the
Messianic line of descent.  
Ruth is in the Hagiographa of the Hebrew Bible.

1 Samuel shows the beginning of the monarchy of Israel.  1 Samuel chronicles the life of the
last judge, Samuel, and the first king which the people cry for him to appoint, Saul.  It records
the rebellion of the people against God, and his allowance of appointing a king.  
1 Samuel
also records the annointing and rise of the second king of Israel, David.

2 Samuel shows the change in the monarchy of Israel.  2 Samuel chronicles the riegn of the
second king annointed by Samuel, David.  As with
1 Samuel, the emphasis throughout the
history is not what man has done, or does, but what the relationship between God and Israel
is, and what effects it.

1 Kings shows the glory of the monarchy of Israel and its decline.  1 Kings begins with the
glory of the reign of Solomon, and records the division of the nation into two, Israel and Judah,
upon the death of Solomon.  The people had wanted a king in the face of warnings by God and
the consequences, and now the consequences are paid.  Thus,
1 Kings is the record of the fist
kings of Judah and Israel.

2 Kings shows the degeneration of the nations of Judah and Israel.  2 Kings chronicles the
end of the nations of Israel and Judah.  Israel, because of its evil kings and idolatry is overrun
by the Assyrians.  Judah, although some better, follows the same path as Israel, because of its
evil kings and idolatry, being overrun by Babylon.

1 Chronicles shows the history of Israel through the reign of David in a nutshell.  1 Chronicles
records the genealogy, with brief notes of history, from Adam to Jonathan, the son of King Saul;
then, records the reign of David in three times the space given from Adam to Saul.  
1
Chronicles
is in The Hagiographa of the Hebrew  Bible.

2 Chronicles shows the reign of Solomon and the rest of the kings of Judah.  Where 1 & 2
Kings
 chronicled the kings of Judah and Israel, 2 Chronicles records the reign of the kings of
Judah alone.  Judah deserves a greater coverage and emphasis because it is from this nation
the Savior would come.  
2 Chronicles also takes the reader up to the time of the edict of Cyrus,
and the restoration of Jerusalem and the Temple.  
2 Chronicles is in the Hagiographa of the
Hebrew Bible.

Ezra shows the beginning of the period of the restoration of Jerusalem and the temple.  Ezra
records the edict of Cyrus and the return of the Jews to rebuild the temple, their difficulties in
rebuilding the temple, and the reforms instituted by Ezra.

Nehemiah shows the continuance of the period of restoration of Jerusalem and the temple.  
Nehemiah records the return of Nehemiah to Jerusalem, construction of the wall of Jerusalem,
and reforms instituted by Nehemiah.  
Ezra deals more specifically with the restoration of the
temple, while
Nehemiah deals with the restoration of the wall.

Ezra shows the beginning of the period of the restoration of Jerusalem and the temple.  Ezra
records the edict of Cyrus and the return of the Jews to rebuild the temple, their difficulties in
rebuilding the temple, and the reforms instituted by Ezra.

Nehemiah shows the continuance of the period of restoration of Jerusalem and the temple.  
Nehemiah records the return of Nehemiah to Jerusalem, construction of the wall of Jerusalem,
and reforms instituted by Nehemiah.  
Ezra deals more specifically with the restoration of the
temple, while
Nehemiah deals with the restoration of the wall.

Esther shows the preservation of the children of Israel, even in the period of bondage.  Esther
is the story of a young woman of Judah, who rises to be queen of the Medes and Persians,
and saves the Jews from a plot to kill them.  A great illustration of the providential care of God,
the name of God is not mentioned in all of the book; yet, God's hand can be seen in every
action that takes place.  
Esther is in The Hagiographa of the Hebrew Bible.