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of the New Testament
Schaff's Quotes 2
NOTES.

The following testimonies to the value of the Scriptures from different schools of thought are
worth comparing.

From the Preface of King JAMES’S TRANSLATORS (now rarely printed) :

“The Scriptures then being acknowledged to be so full and so perfect, how can we excuse
ourselves of negligence, if we do not study them, of curiosity, if we be not content with them?
Men talk much of how many sweet and goodly things it had hanging on it; of the Philosopher
s stone, that it turneth copper into gold; of Cornucopia, that it had all things necessary for food
in it; of Panaces the herb, that it was good for all diseases ; of Catholicon the drug, that it is
instead of all purges; of Vulcan s Armor, that it was an armor of proof against all thrusts, and
all blows, etc. Well, that which they falsely or vainly attributed to these things, for bodily good,
we may justly and with full measure ascribe unto the Scripture for spiritual. It is not only an
armor, but also a whole armory of weapons, both offensive and defensive ; whereby we may
save ourselves and put the enemy to flight. It is not an herb, but a tree, or rather a whole
paradise of trees of life, which bring forth fruit every month, and the fruit thereof is for meat,
and the leaves for medicine. It is not a pot of manna or a cruse of oil, which were for memory
only, or for a meal s meat or two, but as it were a shower of heavenly bread sufficient for a
whole host, be it never so great, and as it were a whole cellar full of oil-vessels ; whereby all
our necessities may be provided for, and our debts discharged. In a word, it is a Panary of
wholesome food against renowed 1 traditions; a Physician s shop (St. Basil callcth it) of
preservatives against poisoned heresies; a Pandect of profitable laws against rebellious
spirits; a treasury of most costly jewels against beggarly rudiments ; finally, a fountain of most
pure water springing up unto everlasting life. And what marvel? the original thereof being from
heaven, not from earth ; the Author being GOD, not man ; the Editer, the Holy Spirit, not the wit
of the apostles or prophets ; the penmen, such as were sanctified from the womb, and
endued with a principal portion of (Jon s Spirit; the matter, verity, piety, purity, uprightness; the
form. GOD S Word, GOD S testimony, GOD S oracles, the word of truth, the word of salvation,
etc.; the effects, light of understanding, stableness of persuasion, repentance from dead
works, newness of life, holiness, peace, joy in the Holy Ghost; lastly, the end and reward of
the study thereof, fellowship with the saints, participation of the heavenly nature, fruition of an
inheritance immortal, undefiled, and that never shall fade away. Happy is the man that
delighteth in the Scripture, and thrice happy that meditateth in it day and night.”

Dr. ??????? (Bishop of Lincoln), who represents the reverent, devout, patristic, high-Anglican
type of exegesis, closes the Preface to his Commentary on the New Testament thus: Some
have disparaged the style of Scripture as barbarous, and others have apologized for it as the
work of illiterate and unlearned men. But surely these notions concerning it are very
erroneous. The diction of Scripture, it is true, is not the language of any other composition in
the world. The Greek of the New Testament is not the Greek of Xenophon, Plato, or
Demosthenes. It is a language of its own. And we need not scruple to affirm that, in precision
of expression, in pure and native simplicity, in delicacy of handling, in the grouping of words
and phrases, in dignified and majestic sublimity, it has no rival in the world. "The more
carefully it is studied, the more clearly will this appear.

Nihil otiosum in Sacra Scripture!

(Origen, in Epist. ad Roman, c. 1).

Nihil vacuum, neque. sine signo, apud Deum 1

(Irenaeus, iv. 21). Every sentence we might almost say every phrase is fraught with meaning.
As it is in the book of Nature, so is it in the pages of Holy Writ. Both are from the same Divine
Hand. And if we apply to the language of Holy Scripture the same microscopic process which
we use in scrutinizing the beauties of the natural world, and which reveals to us exquisite
colors and the most graceful texture in the petals of a flower, the fibres of a plant, the plumage
of a bird, or the wings of an insect, we shall discover new sources of delight and admiration
in the least portions of Holy Writ, and believe that it may be one of the employments of angels
and beatified saints, in another state of existence, to gaze on the glorious mysteries of God s
Holy Word."

Rev. F. W. ROBKUTSON, the genial and eloquent preacher of Brighton, of broad and liberal
sympathies, pays this tribute to the Bible (in his sermon on Inspiration) : This collection of
books has been to the world what no other book has ever been to a nation. States have been
founded on its principles. Kings rule by a compact based on it. Men hold the Bible in their
hands when they give solemn evidence affecting life, death, or property : the sick man is
almost afraid to die unless the Book be within reach of his hands; the battle-ship goes into
action with one on board whose office is to expound it; its prayers, its Psalms, are the
language we use when we speak to God; eighteen centuries have found no holier, no diviner
language. If ever there has been a prayer or a hymn enshrined in the heart of a nation, you are
sure to find its basis in the Bible. There is no new religious idea given to the world, but it is
merely the development of something given in the Bible. The very translation of it has fixed the
language and settled the idioms of speech. Germany and England speak as they speak
because the Bible was translated. It has made the most illiterate peasant more familiar with
the history, customs, and geography of ancient Palestine than with the localities of his own
country. Men who know nothing of the Grampians, of Snowdon, or of Skiddaw, are at home in
Zion, the Lake of Genesareth, or among the hills of Carmel.

People who know little about London, know by heart the places in Jerusalem where those
blessed feet trod which were nailed to the cross. Men who know nothing of the architecture of
a Christian cathedral, can yet tell you about the pattern of the Holy Temple. Even this shows
us the influence of the Bible. The orator holds a thousand men for half an hour breathless a
thousand men as one, listening to his single word. But this Word of God has held a thousand
years spell-bound; held them by an abiding power, even the universality of its truth ; and we
feel it to be no more a collection of books, but the Book." blessed feet trod which were
nailed to the cross. Men who know nothing of the architecture of a Christian cathedral, can yet
tell you about the pattern of the Holy Temple. Even this shows us the influence of the Bible.
The orator holds a thousand men for half an hour breathless a thousand men as one,
listening to his single word. But this Word of God has held a thousand years spell-bound;
held them by an abiding power, even the universality of its truth ; and we feel it to be no more
a collection of books, but the Book."